Personal tools
You are here: Home Publications

Scientific Papers

ISSI Research Papers

Paper information
Title
Ownership and Dominance in Tabletop Based Collaboration for Creative Tasks
Authors
Alejandro Catalá Bolós
Javier Jaén Martínez
Fernando García Sanjuan
Patricia Pons Tomás
Published in
Actas de las Jornadas sobre aprendizaje colaborativo en entornos virtuales de la red; Red temática sobre Aprendizaje Colaborativo en Entornos Virtuales (RACEV) - 2012
Abstract
Interactive tabletops are considered as useful tools to enrich activities requiring collaboration between co-located users involved in tasks in which organizational or spatial information is meaningful. Creative learning could also benefit from tabletop technologies because their interaction specific characteristics could better support or improve essential processes in creativity, such as the generation, sharing, showing and exchange of ideas. This paper presents an empirical study with teenagers using tabletops in order to further explore and understand how collaboration happens in tasks involving creative problems. In particular, two different tabletops have been used in two assembly tasks, whose solutions consist of assembling building blocks creatively. The digital platform relies on an interactive surface so that building elements remain confined to the surface whereas the physical-only platform is based on graspable tangible blocks. The experimental setting includes a loop with three places. They are the thinking, discussion and implementation places in which participants had to create, discuss, and implement solutions to the given problem respectively. Departing from the video recordings on the implementation performance along with the information about the ownership or who originally created a solution proposal, the participation differences between group members were measured. This measure is called dominance because it quantifies how much each member dominated during the implementation of a single solution. The dominance plots show that the loop worked properly as it allowed non-owners to actively participate in the implementation of solutions in both platforms. Dominance showed to be more balanced in the digital platform than in the physical-only one, as the participation differences are lower and the proportion of non-owner versus owner dominated solutions is similar.


BibTeX
@misc{issi_web:id:414,
        title =  "Ownership and Dominance in Tabletop Based Collaboration for Creative Tasks",
        author = "Alejandro Catalá Bolós and Javier Jaén Martínez and Fernando García Sanjuan and Patricia Pons Tomás",
        booktitle = "Actas de las Jornadas sobre aprendizaje colaborativo en entornos virtuales de la red; Red temática sobre Aprendizaje Colaborativo en Entornos Virtuales (RACEV)",
        year = "2012",
        eprint = "http://issi.dsic.upv.es/publications/archives/",
        url = "",
        abstract = "Interactive tabletops are considered as useful tools to enrich activities requiring collaboration between co-located users involved in tasks in which organizational or spatial information is meaningful. Creative learning could also benefit from tabletop technologies because their interaction specific characteristics could better support or improve essential processes in creativity, such as the generation, sharing, showing and exchange of ideas. This paper presents an empirical study with teenagers using tabletops in order to further explore and understand how collaboration happens in tasks involving creative problems. In particular, two different tabletops have been used in two assembly tasks, whose solutions consist of assembling building blocks creatively. The digital platform relies on an interactive surface so that building elements remain confined to the surface whereas the physical-only platform is based on graspable tangible blocks. The experimental setting includes a loop with three places. They are the thinking, discussion and implementation places in which participants had to create, discuss, and implement solutions to the given problem respectively. Departing from the video recordings on the implementation performance along with the information about the ownership or who originally created a solution proposal, the participation differences between group members were measured. This measure is called dominance because it quantifies how much each member dominated during the implementation of a single solution. The dominance plots show that the loop worked properly as it allowed non-owners to actively participate in the implementation of solutions in both platforms. Dominance showed to be more balanced in the digital platform than in the physical-only one, as the participation differences are lower and the proportion of non-owner versus owner dominated solutions is similar."
}